Feb 062012
 

Sunday I woke up with inspiration.  I set out to create a delicious vegan casserole for the family that they would like and was met with major success!

But let me go back to the beginning.  The sauce.

I have been struggling with the fact that my family still eats meat and made a decision to listen to my heart and make another change.  Up to now, even though I gave up meat and dairy, I had still been buying organic free range meats, justifying the fact it was organic and free-range. 

Then I came across a tweet from my friend Maria with links to two great articles by Ari Solomon, one of which was this article.

This paragraph really got me, “There is a video making rounds on YouTube that shows a lone cow shaking in terror as she contemplates walking down the kill chute. She walks forward, then back. Animals can hear and smell the violence and death that awaits them. Their last moments are ones of abject horror and suffering. If you wouldn’t condemn your dog or cat to such a fate, how can you pay for others do it to these poor animals?”

We care about our dogs so much that we agonize over each little malady, but what about the cows, pigs, goats, ducks, lambs, chickens and turkeys?

And then there is the issue of what I thought was “humane meat”. Ari makes a really good point about that as well; he states, “Now, before you start at me with some “humane meat” “happy meat” bullshit please take note that all animals, whether they are raised in the nastiest of factory farms or grass-fed, free-range, blah blah blah, are all sent to the same slaughterhouses. That’s right, your organic steer is being sent to the same hell as a downer cow and will meet the same ghastly end. If you are a “humane meat” consumer, please take a moment and meditate on the whole concept of humane killing… bloody, fearful, struggling, screaming, despairing humane killing. It’s never pretty and it certainly isn’t “humane.”

A very good point indeed.

Ultimately I control what I buy and cook so I simply won’t buy meat and dairy.  It sounds like such a simple decision right?

But when you really think about it, it’s more challenging than that…especially when at this point my family doesn’t want to give up meat and my daughter is allergic to soy, wheat, dairy, eggs, peanuts, walnuts, tree nuts and seeds among a host of other foods.    

I need to come up with some really creative ways to make this change and that scares me a bit because I have limited time, they like meat, and I don’t have buy in from our extended families. As a full time working mom with my own interests as well…..there just isn’t enough time in the day. BUT, I think I can do it if I take one step at a time. I took the first steps of cutting the meat and dairy for myself and I can do this too.  I’m not saying I’ll be perfect 100 percent of the time, hey I’m human, but at least I’m moving in the right direction.

This sauce is my next delicious step.   (Casserole to follow.) 

Caramelized Onion and Cabbage Sauce
Serves 4 – about 1/4 cup each
Vegan, Gluten Free, Dairy Free
Ingredients
2 onions, peeled, halved and sliced thinly
3 cups or 1/2 head cabbage, sliced thinly
3/4 to 1 cup veggie broth (salt free, I used home made)
1/4 tsp sea salt (or more, to taste)
1 tsp garlic powder
1/4 cup nutritional yeast

 
Directions

1. Spray skillet with non stick spray and heat over medium high heat. Add onions and cabbage. Add salt, garlic powder and nutritional yeast. Cook 40 minutes, stirring regularly and adding broth when onion-cabbage mixture begins to stick.

2. Blend the heck out of the mixture using a high speed blender, adding additional veggie broth as needed until desired consistency is reached.  Taste and reseason if necessary.  Use in place of cheese sauce.


Nutrition Facts
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving


Calories 69.9
Total Fat 0.7 g
Saturated Fat 0.1 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 161.7 mg
Potassium 418.3 mg
Total Carbohydrate 12.5 g
Dietary Fiber 4.5 g
Sugars 0.2 g
Protein 5.9 g


Vitamin A 1.8 %
Vitamin B-12 66.5 %
Vitamin B-6 247.4 %
Vitamin C 41.9 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 0.7 %
Calcium 4.8 %
Copper 5.5 %
Folate 39.8 %
Iron 5.0 %
Magnesium 6.5 %
Manganese 11.8 %
Niacin 141.4 %
Pantothenic Acid 6.5 %
Phosphorus 12.1 %
Riboflavin 284.8 %
Selenium 17.7 %
Thiamin 324.0 %
Zinc 12.1 %


*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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