May 022014
 

The secret is in the sauce with my Garlic Black Beans over Rice Pasta. Extra garlic, onions, Kalamata olive paste and sundried tomatoes are tied together with a dash of balsamic for pure perfection.

Garlic Black Beans

Garlic Black Beans

What is the first thing you are usually thinking about when you get up each morning?

If I wake up before my alarm, my brain tends to go towards what I need to get done that day and I automatically guide it towards what I’m grateful for. If it is my alarm that wakes me up on the other hand, I’m thinking how tired I am already before I can start directing my thoughts towards a more positive place.

I’m thinking about it this morning because I came across this amazingly eye opening video by Marie Forleo interviewing Arianna Huffington. Marie writes, “Arianna Huffington, founder of the Huffington Post, has been wildly successful, but was working so hard at one point in her life that she found herself sick and burnt out, overworked, and boggled down with things to do.

In her book Thrive, Arianna Huffington shares the secret to how changing your mindset and a few habits in your daily routine can help you unlock your true wisdom, allow you to come up with your best ideas, and be your most creative self.

She’s learned from experience that following these simple steps can lead to a more productive, less stressful, and more joyful life where you’re not strangled by your to-do list and have enough time to actually accomplish (and enjoy) the things in your life that matter most.”

How to be more productive and less stressed? Sign me up! The most eye opening part for me was when she said if you start becoming fearful or stressed, change the channel.

What the hell does this have with Garlic Black Beans over Rice Pasta? Because this was a night that I was harried, stressed, tired and the last thing I could think of what to make for dinner. I had a bunch of things I needed to use in the fridge or it would be too late (and I loathe waste) so, as much as I wanted to, I didn’t go out and buy dinner. This choice would save time and money in the end.

I had to stop and tell myself that there is nothing else I can do in this moment while I’m making dinner – effectively “changing the channel”. I was able to refocus, look at what I had, and create this meal that came out deliciously, surprisingly well. Instead of traditional Cuban or Mexican spices, the olives and sundried tomatoes give this dish almost a meaty texture and taste and the balsamic vinegar at the finish adds a tangy layer of depth that simply makes the dish. We all went in for seconds – it is even going on my favorites list!

What is the first thing you usually think about in the morning? If you watch this video, what was your favorite tip?

Garlicky Black Beans

Garlicky Black Beans

Garlicky Black Beans over Rice Pasta

Serves 6
Vegan, Gluten Free
Printable Recipe

Ingredients

1 tsp EVOO
1 onion, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 tsp sea salt & dash fresh ground pepper
2 cups chopped kale
4 1/2 cups well cooked black beans (or 3 14.5 oz cans, rinse and drain only one, reserve liquid from second)
2-3 cups veggie broth or water (depending on how thick you prefer)
3 Tbsp Kalamata olive spread, such as Organic Divina
3 Tbsp julienned sundried tomatoes
2 tsp course ground prepared mustard
1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
10 oz rice pasta, cooked to package directions

Directions

1. Heat a stock pot over medium high heat; add olive oil; sauté onion about 5 minutes (add a tbsp of water if onions begin to stick); reduce heat; add garlic; cook, stirring constantly for 1 minute; add salt, pepper, kale, black beans, veggie broth, olive spread, sundried tomatoes and mustard. Simmer about 20 minutes or until soup has thickened. Stir in balsamic vinegar. Serve over rice pasta.

Nutrition Facts
5 Servings
Amount Per Serving

Calories 426.4
Total Fat 7.0 g
Saturated Fat 0.7 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.7 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 766.1 mg (use water to reduce to 424 mg)
Potassium 670.5 mg
Total Carbohydrate 66.6 g
Dietary Fiber 14.2 g
Sugars 1.6 g
Protein 16.1 g

Vitamin A 146.2 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin 6 9.8 %
Vitamin C 39.7 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 2.8 %
Calcium 7.5 %
Copper 17.2 %
Folate 41.2 %
Iron 20.1 %
Magnesium 21.9 %
Manganese 38.7 %
Niacin 17.1 %
Pantothenic Acid 3.5 %
Phosphorus 17.5 %
Riboflavin 6.7 %
Selenium 3.2 %
Thiamin 32.1 %
Zinc 9.2 %

*Percent Daily Values for Garlic Black Beans over Rice Pasta are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Sep 202013
 

 

Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats with Sweet Banana Chips

Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats with Sweet Banana Chips

 Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats with Sweet Banana Chips ~ a unique breakfast idea.

Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats with Sweet Banana Chips

Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats with Sweet Banana Chips

Are you the kind of person that sticks with their tried and true breakfast? Or are you someone who mixes it up on a whim?

Either way this dish is for you! If you love your tried and true breakfast then try this for dinner, and for you fly-by-the-seat of your pants sort of people – hang on to those britches!

Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats with Sweet Banana Chips

Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats with Sweet Banana Chips

 I have done this flavor combo in the past before switching to a plant based diet.  It was so wonderful that I tried it again with hummus but this is the first time I’ve used banana chips.  What I like about the chips is that they offer another layer of texture over this savory version of oatmeal.  Don’t get hung up on the fact that oatmeal is typically eaten at breakfast – in this case think of it more as a stand-in for rice but creamier.  I love the aromatic cumin and the fresh cilantro when mixed with the classic black beans, onions and garlic. The bananas just give it that sweet hmmm  factor.

Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats with Sweet Banana Chips

Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats with Sweet Banana Chips

Cumin Scented Black Beans and Savory Oats
with Sweet Banana Chips

Serves 4
Vegan, Gluten Free
Printable Recipe
**Ingredients on sale at Native Sun Natural Food Market, Sept 7-Oct 6, 2013

Ingredients

Oats
1 cup gluten free (or regular) old fashioned oats
2 cups vegetable broth, divided (plus 1 Tbsp)
1/4 tsp salt, divided

Beans
1 Tbsp broth or water
1/2 red onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 tsp minced fresh jalapeno
1/4 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp chili powder
1/8 tsp black pepper (or less)
1 14oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
1/4 cup chopped dried banana chips**
1/4 cup fresh cilantro or culantro, chopped

Directions

1. Heat 1 3/4 cup broth and 1/8 tsp salt in a small sauce pan to a boil; add oats, stir, reduce heat and cook about 10 minutes or until liquid is absorbed.

2. Heat 1 Tbsp water or broth in another small saucepan; add onion and cook about 5 minutes, stirring frequently; add garlic and jalapeno, cook an additional 2 minutes; add cumin, chili powder, black pepper and 1/8 tsp salt, cook 1 minutes; add beans and 1/4 cup broth; bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer about 10 minutes; taste and adjust seasoning if needed.

3. Top about 1/2 cup oats with generous 1/4 beans, 1 tbsp chopped banana chips and 1 Tbsp fresh cilantro.

Nutrition Facts
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving 

Calories 263.1
Total Fat 4.5 g
Saturated Fat 2.5 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.8 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.7 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 619.4 mg
Potassium 438.7 mg
Total Carbohydrate 45.3 g
Dietary Fiber 11.8 g
Sugars 4.1 g
Protein 12.1 g

Vitamin A 6.7 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 6.9 %
Vitamin C 3.8 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 2.2 %
Calcium 3.8 %
Copper 12.5 %
Folate 39.3 %
Iron 19.8
Magnesium 20.0 %
Manganese 31.9 %
Niacin 3.2 %
Pantothenic Acid 3.3 %
Phosphorus 15.6 %
Riboflavin 5.2 %
Selenium 2.5 %
Thiamin 22.9 %
Zinc 8.5 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

May 152013
 

Surprise and delight your friends with this Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge!

 Over a week ago I had this post read to print when the unthinkable happened.  In an effort to get back to some normalcy and keep my mind off things I am up and looking at my site and want to share something positive and fun with you – this brownie/fudge recipes.
Mila lovers - this is another great way to eat your Mila.
I’m looking forward to making these again as soon as I can.


 

 There are certain flavors that just don’t work.

Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge

Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge

Like toothpaste and orange juice. Yuck!

toothpaste-and-orange-juice-ice-cream-ben-and-jerry

Black Bean Quinoa Brownie Fudge (Photo after refrigerating)

Black Bean Quinoa Brownie Fudge (Photo after refrigerating)

But there are some things that go together surprisingly well.

Cocoa powder in a chili recipe, bananas and beans in a salsa….

Black Bean Quinoa Brownie Fudge

Black Bean Quinoa Brownie Fudge

black beans and quinoa together in a dessert.

I’ve seen so many black bean brownie recipes recently that, frankly, look too dry. And I found none that had both black beans and quinoa together, so I thought, why not create one!  I love my brownies super moist and gooey rather than cakey.  If you want a more cake-like brownie try adding more quinoa flour and see how that works.

Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge

Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge

 These little brownies are so moist and rich I had to call them brownie fudge. They are delicious at room temp or right out of the fridge – a perfect snack, dessert or even breakfast. My friend Justine and I each polished off two servings with coffee.

After one bite, Justine’s eyebrows rose in surprise - they’re delicious!

Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge

Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge

We all know the how great quinoa is for us – the super nutrient dense little seed that markets itself as a grain.

You sneaky little seed, we’re on to you.

Quinoa is high in protein, anti-inflammatory phytonutrients, and has a nice dose of healthy fat.
The high amounts of lysine and isoleucine actually make quinoa a complete protein source. The next time someone asks how you get your protein on a plant based diet and tells you that you can’t get all your nine essential amino acids – tell them to look up the facts about quinoa! Worlds Healthiest Foods is a great resource.

I hope you try these just out of curiosity and are pleasantly surprised as how delicious these are!

Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge

Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge

Decadent Black Bean and Quinoa Brownie Fudge

Serves 12
Vegan, Gluten Free
Printable Recipe

Ingredients

1 14.5oz can (1 1/2 cups) black beans (unseasoned, rinsed and drained)
1/3 cup agave or maple syrup
1/4 cup virgin coconut oil, melted (or vegetable oil) + 1 tsp to “butter’ baking dish
2 tsp vanilla
1/4 cup pure raw cane sugar
1 chia egg (1 Tbsp Mila + 3 Tbsp water)**
1/4 cup quinoa (ground into flour with a Magic Bullet, coffee grinder or blender)
1/4 tsp salt
3 Tbsp raw cacao powder (or cocoa powder) + 1 tsp
1/2 cup vegan mini chocolate chips (or chocolate chips of choice)

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350F. Spread 1 tsp coconut oil evenly over 6×6 inch baking dish; sprinkle with 1 tsp cacao powder.

2. Blend black beans, agave, coconut oil and vanilla in a blender; mix sugar, quinoa flour, salt and cacao powder in a bowl and pour black bean mixture over evenly; mix well to combine; stir in chia egg, stir in chocolate chips; pour into baking dish; cook for 20 minutes or until top is firm.

3. Refrigerate 1 hour to overnight and cut into 12 squares.

**I recommend using Mila in this recipe.  Why? Read my story.  To purchase click here and use US11065661.

Nutrition Facts
12 Servings
Amount Per Serving 

Calories 182.6
Total Fat 8.0 g
Saturated Fat 5.7 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.3 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.3 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 49.1 mg
Potassium 102.9 mg
Total Carbohydrate 26.3 g
Dietary Fiber 3.0 g
Sugars 12.1 g
Protein 2.9 g

Vitamin B-6 0.8 %
Calcium 1.4 %
Copper 4.8 %
Folate 8.1 %
Iron 5.8 %
Magnesium 6.3 %
Manganese 7.4 %
Niacin 0.7 %
Pantothenic Acid 0.6 %
Phosphorus 7.3 %
Riboflavin 8.1 %
Selenium 0.6 %
Thiamin 3.6 %
Zinc 2.2 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Apr 122013
 

  “What….is the number one reason people don’t join a CSA?” Francisco, the owner of KyV Farm asked me with eyebrows raised and eyes wide, waiting for my answer…..

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

 “UM….because they haven’t heard of one?”

 “No! Because people want convenience!”

Dang. I missed that one.

Francisco likes to quiz me on farm trivia. I had already correctly answered the last question of, “What is the first thing you do when you start a business?”  The answer is to tell people about it – market, start a facebook page, get a website.  I was very proud of myself for answering that one correctly.

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

Hmm….that is true. People want and need convenience nowadays. I know I do. Working full time, blogging, running a business and writing recipes for Native Sun and KyV on top of making sure I spend time with my family means I’m a super busy person.  I wish I could make everything from absolute raw and basic ingredients and spend my time writing witty repartee and creating unique and creative photos but hey, I’m happy with what I can do at this point and I give myself a break with having to do semi-homemade recipes.  The one thing I refuse to skimp on  is the veggies. I want fresh, local and organic and I want to know my farmer.

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

Do you agree that the reason most people don’t join a CSA is because of the convenience factor? 

I’d love to hear from you, my readers!

What would make you want to join a CSA?

What if the veggies were already prepped and ready to eat?
How much more would you pay for that convenience? 
What if a bunch of organic kale was $3, would you pay $4 to have it washed and prepped?

What if you could buy the veggies from the farm in a “salad kit” like from your grocery so you only had to throw on the dressing?  I would probably pay $6 for the entire head of kale and extra veggies thrown in, all prepped and ready to go.

How about ready-made meals?

How awesome would it be to have some vegetarian/vegan options made with organic farm vegetables!  Would you pay $20 for a family of four?

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

There are so many things I love about my CSA that I just got used to making the trip every other week to visit the farm to pick up my veggies and began enjoying the prep work but some pre-made items WOULD be fabulous for those nights I really don’t have the time. Last night, for instance……I didn’t get home until 7:15.  Thank goodness I had grabbed a gorgeous garlic bread from the farm (pictured in these photos) and already had some of their tender lettuce and Vidalia Valley vinaigrette on hand. 

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

Sloppy Joe with Tempeh and Black Beans

 A recent post on My New Roots about a tempeh sandwich popped into my head.  I decided to do a quick, kid-friendly version of Sarah’s recipe….Sloppy Joes!  I found a basic Sloppy Joe recipe on All Recipes, added a bit of love to that, and voila! It was DELICIOUS!  A little spicy, a little sweet, nice and rich from the tomatoes.  I got a good bit of char on tempeh and when paired with that toasted bread…. divine.

Swoon.

Sloppy Joes with Tempeh and Black Beans

Sloppy Joes with Tempeh and Black Beans

 Sloppy Joes with Tempeh and Black Beans

Inspired by My New Roots and All Recipes
Serves 4
Vegan, Gluten Free Option
Printable Recipe

Ingredients

1 Tbsp olive oil, divided
1/2 onion, chopped, KyV Farm
1 14.5oz can fire roasted, diced tomatoes
1/3 cup organic ketchup
2 tsp mustard
2 tsp each onion powder and garlic powder
1/4 tsp salt
3 tsp agave (or brown sugar if you have it)
3 dashes hot sauce (I used Cholula)
1 tsp cider vinegar
1 8oz (226 grams) pkg tempeh (Lightlife)
1/2 cup cooked black beans
8 slices fresh garlic bread, KyV Farm (For gluten free I like Pamela’s GF  Bread Mix – herb option)

Directions

1. Heat 1/2 tbsp olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat; add onion and cook until translucent, about 3 minutes; reduce heat and add tomatoes; stir well and simmer, about 3 minutes.  Meanwhile in a medium bowl mix ketchup, mustard, onion and garlic powder, agave, salt, hot sauce and cider vinegar; stir well and add to skillet with onions and tomatoes; cook down about 3 minutes; spoon mixture back into bowl.

2. Heat 1/2 tbsp olive oil in same skillet over medium high heat; break up tempeh well and add to heated skillet; let brown on first side, about 5 minutes (or until browned), stir and add black beans; cook an additional 3 minutes. Stir in sauce mixture; add up to 1/2 cup water as needed to loosen mixture.

Nutrition Facts (without bread)
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving 

Calories 226.3
Total Fat 9.7 g
Saturated Fat 1.8 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 4.3 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 521.0 mg
Potassium 476.6 mg
Total Carbohydrate 22.2 g
Dietary Fiber 3.0 g
Sugars 8.2 g
Protein 13.5 g

Vitamin A 7.6 %
Vitamin B-12 0.8 %
Vitamin B-6 9.9 %
Vitamin C 17.4 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 2.5 %
Calcium 8.9 %
Copper 21.2 %
Folate 13.0 %
Iron 11.9 %
Magnesium 16.5 %
Manganese 44.2 %
Niacin 8.3 %
Pantothenic Acid 2.5 %
Phosphorus 19.7 %
Riboflavin 13.1 %
Selenium 2.3 %
Thiamin 7.7 %
Zinc 6.6 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Enjoy my Quick and Easy Sloppy Joes with Tempeh and Black Beans!

Mar 102013
 

  PicMonkey Collage

I’ve finally discovered the secrets to making great tasting great veggie or bean burgers when they used to fall apart, turning into mush.

The first secret is some flour – any kind will do; add it a tablespoon at a time until the mixture is firmer but only just stays together.  (This does take some practice because if you add too much, it is firm before you cook it. but after it’s cooked it is too dry.)

Second, add some mila.  It acts as an egg replacer but is a whole, raw food instead of that powdered stuff you buy at the store. (More on mila below.)

Third, put avocado on top. Everything is better with avocado.

Savory Veggie Burger with Vegan Cheese

Savory Veggie Burger with Vegan Cheese

These burgers were actually a round two recipe for me – I used the leftovers from the Quinoa and Black Bean Stew and, using fresh beets from KyV Farm, I re-created the veggie burgers I had recently eaten at Manatee Cafe in St Augustine.  I don’t know what they put in those things but I could eat them every day. Maybe twice a day. Make that three times. They are GOOD.

These burgers are really flavorful with the Bragg Liquid Aminos (tastes like soy sauce), sweet raisins and fresh salsa in the mix.   Put them on a burger bun with some vegan cheese and avocado and I bet you won’t miss the beef!

For my mila lovers out there – this is a great use for it!  In this recipe it acts as an egg replacer and also happens to be a whole, raw food with 3000 mg of Omega 3′s.  This powerful little seed has TONS of benefits and has been all over the news in the past few weeks.  Mila  was recently featured on Good Morning America as a great aid for weight loss! (You can see my friends Greg and Rachel in the clip – SO proud of you guys!). How awesome to finally have a way to help lose weight that isn’t some fake powder shake, pill or pharmaceutical.  It is the seed used in Dr Bob Arnot’s new book the Aztec Diet and was also featured on Fox News. If you are wondering what the heck mila is – you can check it out here.

Veggie Burger

Veggie Burger

Savory Veggie Burger

Inspired by Manatee Cafe Veggie Burger

Serves 6
Vegan, Gluten Free
Printable Recipe
**Veggies from KyV Farm

Ingredients

2 beets**
2 cups finely chopped purple cabbage**
2 red onions with tops, chopped finely (or 1/2 cup chopped onion)**
1/4 cup cooked quinoa (or cooked rice or any grain)
1/3 cup cooked black beans (or beans of choice)
1/2 cup nutritional yeast
2 Tbsp flour of choice
1/4 cup raisins

Flavor punch!

1/2 cup salsa mixed with 2 Tbsp mila as binder (Mila is optional but I suggest trying an additional Tbsp flour without it; however, this has not been tested.)
1/4 cup Bragg Liquid Aminos (or tamari or soy sauce)
2 tsp garlic powder
2 tsp onion powder

Optional toppings

2 avocados
3 red onion slices, chopped
Vegan cheese slices

Directions

**This is a great place to use left over quinoa and black bean stew in place of the precooked grains and beans.   Another option is to use canned beans and quickly cook the quinoa.  Feel free to also precook the beets, cabbage and onion in step one the day before.

1. Preheat oven to 350F. Cut tops off beets and reserve for another use; wrap beets in foil and bake for 1 hour or until soft enough to be easily pierced by a fork; unwrap and cool enough to handle; peel and chop finely. Meanwhile heat a medium pot sprayed with nonstick cooking spray; add cabbage and onion and cook until softened, about five ingredients.

2. Mix the beets through the raisins, stir in flavor punch! Preheat broiler to high; spray a sheet pan with non-stick spray form veggie burgers into six patties; broil about 3 to 5 minutes but watch closely as broilers vary. Flip when firm enough to flip; broil an additional 3 to 5 minutes or until firm. Top each burger with a slice of cheese, and/or 1/3 avocado and a sprinkling of red onion.

Nutrition Facts (Without optional toppings.)
6 Servings
Amount Per Serving 

Calories 119.3
Total Fat 1.3 g
Saturated Fat 0.1 g
P
olyunsaturated Fat 0.6 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.1 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
S
odium 124.2 mg
Potassium 323.7 mg
Total Carbohydrate 21.6 g
Dietary Fiber 4.1 g
Sugars 7.9 g
P
rotein 6.8 g

Vitamin A 3.6 %
Vitamin B-12 44.4 %
V
itamin B-6 51.5 %
Vitamin C 25.5 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 1.6 %
Calcium 3.3 %
C
opper 7.2 %
Folate 15.2 %
Iron 8.3 %
Magnesium 8.4 %
Manganese 17.9 %
Niacin 36.7 %
Pantothenic Acid 68.6 %
Phosphorus 10.8 %
R
iboflavin 42.4 %
Selenium 1.3 %
Thiamin 42.6 %
Zinc 2.8 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Mar 052013
 

 Black Bean Stew with Quinoa Black Bean Stew with Quinoa

Do you ever get home from work tired and without any sort of plan for dinner?  That’s the time that fast food starts looking palatable.  I say – don’t do it!  Reach for a few cans out of the pantry or pre-cooked frozen beans and grab the quinoa. It only takes 20 minutes to prepare.  Many times I do an alteration of a previous recipe because it’s easy and doesn’t take as much thought when I haven’t planned something out.  Isn’t that what most of us do in our busy lives? Draw from experience and then use what we have on hand.   It’s good to throw in a completely new recipe every now and then, but that takes a bit more time and effort. This stew is a alteration of the below black bean soup and will definitely be added into my normal rotation along with bean quesadillas, oat and bean burgers and pasta.

Black Bean Soup with Forbidden Rice

Black Bean Soup with Forbidden Rice

Black Bean Soup with Forbidden Rice

Here are a few more easy black bean recipes to help you through those busy nights….

Upside Down Lentil Pot Pie

Upside Down Lentil Pot Pie

Upside Down Lentil Pot Pie

Garlicky Black Bean Mila Dip

Garlicky Black Bean Mila Dip

Garlicky Black Bean Mila Dip

Easy Mexican Tortilla Bake

Easy Mexican Tortilla Bake with Mila

Easy Mexican Tortilla Bake with Mila

Vegan Tropical Black Bean Burgers
with Cucumber Mint Mango Peach Salsa

Tropical Black Bean Burgers

Tropical Black Bean Burgers

Ten Minute, Five Ingredient Black Bean Burgers

Ten Minute, Five Ingredient Black Bean Burgers

Ten Minute, Five Ingredient Black Bean Burgers

Avocado, Mango and Black Bean Tostada

Avocado, Mango and Caribbean Black Bean Tostada

Avocado, Mango and Caribbean Black Bean Tostada

This recipe was so quick, easy and delicious.  It is very filling with tons of protein and fiber.  For those people who ask me how I get protein on a plant based diet I can show them this recipe!  The leftovers are versatile and make a great lunch (just add a bit of water before re-heating) and I even added them into a veggie burger – recipe to follow!

Black Bean Stew with Quinoa

Black Bean Stew with Quinoa

 Black Bean Stew with Quinoa

Serves 6 (about 1 1/4 cups stew and 1/2 cup quinoa)
Vegan, Gluten Free
Printable Recipe

Ingredients

1 Tbsp avocado oil (or oil of choice)
1/2 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 cups vegetable broth
2 14.5-oz cans black beans (Tree of life)
1 14.5-oz can fire roasted diced tomato, drained
2 tsp adobo seasoning

Quinoa
1 cup quinoa
2 cups vegetable broth

Directions

1. Rinse and drain quinoa with a fine mesh strainer; bring quinoa and broth to a boil in a large sauce pan, cover and reduce heat, simmer 15 minutes; remove from heat and let sit 5 minutes; season with salt and pepper.

2. Heat 1 Tbsp avocado oil in a medium sauce pan over medium high heat, add onions and cook 3 minutes until translucent, reduce heat and add garlic, stirring frequently, an additional 2 minutes; add beans, tomatoes, broth and adobo seasoning; simmer about 10 minutes; puree with an immersion blender or in batches in a blender to thicken.

Nutrition Facts
6 Servings
Amount Per Serving 

Calories 337.1
Total Fat 4.9 g
Saturated Fat 0.5 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.7 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 592.8 mg
Potassium 626.1 mg
Total Carbohydrate 57.2 g
Dietary Fiber 14.8 g
Sugars 3.5 g
Protein 16.9 g

Vitamin A 5.2 %
Vitamin B-6 6.7 %
Vitamin C 12.7 %
Vitamin E 1.5 %
Calcium 5.3 %
Copper 17.1 %
Folate 51.9 %
Iron 30.0 %
Magnesium 24.5 %
Manganese 32.9 %
Niacin 3.6 %
Pantothenic Acid 3.6 %
Phosphorus 46.1 %
Riboflavin 61.7 %
Selenium 2.8 %
Thiamin 23.0 %
Zinc 10.6 

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Enjoy this fabulous Black Bean Stew with Quinoa!

Oct 222012
 

Upside Down Lentil Pot Pie

So last Wednesday night I picked my daughter up, got home and had to make dinner. My hubby was still at work and I did not feel like cooking. I walked to my pantry. Nothing. Walked to my fridge. Nothing.  Opened the freezer.  Pie crusts!  Ok so what could I make with pie crust that involved zero pre-cooking.

Ha! Soup of course! And what better soup to use than Amy’s Kitchen Lentil Soup?  I didn’t even get a bowl out; I mixed the three ingredients right in the pie crust – no seasoning necessary.  The soup added plenty of flavor.

I remember the days when I would use a can of Cream of Mushroom soup to make different dishes ….until I read the ingredients. What do you want to bet that most of this soup has genetically modified ingredients?  

WATER, MUSHROOMS, MODIFIED FOOD STARCH, WHEAT FLOUR, VEGETABLE OIL (CORN, COTTONSEED, CANOLA AND/OR SOYBEAN), SUGAR, SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, CREAM (MILK), CONTAINS LESS THAN 1 % OF: LOWER SODIUM NATURAL SEA SALT, POTASSIUM CHLORIDE, SALT, CALCIUM CARBONATE, DEXTROSE, DISODIUM INOSINATE, DISODIUM GUANYLATE, SPICE EXTRACT, MALTODEXTRIN, FLAVORING, DEHYDRATED GARLIC, MUSHROOM POWDER.

Here is what is in the Amy’s Kitchen:

Ingredients : No Trans Fat/No Added MSG/No Preservatives (Vegan) Filtered water, organic lentils, organic celery, organic carrots, organic onions, organic potatoes, organic extra virgin olive oil, sea salt, spices*.*100% pure herbs & spices (no hidden ingredients)

We can actually read the ingredients – Lentils. Celery. Carrots…..
None of us are going to go to their pantry and grab some modified food starch, maltodextrin or  disodium inosinate.

Remember that if you aren’t using fresh in a recipe – be sure to read the ingredients.

Upside Down Lentil Pot Pie

I will admit that did not have high hopes for this recipe and was not even going to record it – but when it come out of the oven, with the seasoned lentils in a flavorful pie crust my little ugly duckling became a swan. I had to take a few photos to save this one for later, and in fact, I’m marking this one as a “favorite”.

Bookmark this recipe for the next time someone tells you it is too difficult to eat vegetarian or vegan and it is too much work to prepare dinner so they just went to the drive through.

Upside Down Lentil Pot Pie

Upside Down Lentil Pot Pie 

Serves 6
Vegan
Printable Recipe
**Items on sale now at Native Sun Natural Foods Market Oct 7 to Nov 6, 2012

Ingredients

1 frozen whole wheat pie crust Wholly Wholesome)
1 can fire roasted diced tomatoes, drained (Muir Glen)**
1 cup cooked black beans, rinsed and drained (Tree of Life)**
1 can Amy’s Kitchen Lentil Soup

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375F. Pour tomatoes, beans and lentil soup into frozen pie crust; stir and bake 25 to 30 minutes or until heated through.

Nutrition Facts
6 Servings
Amount Per Serving

Calories 228.7
Total Fat 9.8 g
Saturated Fat 4.2 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 480.3 mg
Potassium 276.8 mg
Total Carbohydrate 27.5 g
Dietary Fiber 7.3 g
Sugars 4.5 g
Protein 8.0 g

Vitamin A 18.4 %
Vitamin B-6 1.0 %
Vitamin C 20.0 %
Calcium 3.1 %
Copper 6.3 %
Folate 10.7 %
Iron 10.3 %
Magnesium 5.0 %
Manganese 6.4 %
Niacin 0.7 %
Pantothenic Acid 0.7 %
Phosphorus 4.0 %
Riboflavin 1.0 %
Selenium 0.5 %
Thiamin 4.7 %
Zinc 2.1 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Sep 272012
 

My mom is an amazing woman.  We talk every morning and she is my coach, friend and therapist all rolled into one.  Never have I met a more positive, loving and gentle soul. She devotes herself to helping others and listening to their problems, at the same time battling a degenerative disease - Multiple Sclerosis.

MS is a disease that degrades the myelin sheaths around the nerves in the brain and spinal cord.  When this sheathing is lost the nerves have trouble conducting signals.  This means that mom gets tired….VERY tired.  She tells me it is sort of like a cup of energy and when you use it all up, that is it for the day.  There is no pushing through it or ignoring it and moving on.  During times of change or extreme stress she sometimes has an exacerbation where the MS flares up and she is complete incapacitated for a period of time.  The last time was when my daughter was born.  She is her only granddaughter, but she could barely get to the hospital or hold my daughter – it was horrible and I know my mom was so sad to not be present every minute in the beginning.

My mom’s affliction is one of the main reasons I am so passionate about Mila.  It came into my life through her visits to the neurologist where she would return and tell me about her amazing neurology nurse practitioner, Megan.  Of course, my mom, being her friendly self, started telling Megan all about what I’m up to and how I write a food blog.  Little did I know that Megan is also very interested in treating disease and illness with whole foods as much as possible.  She contacted me to see if I had heard of Mila – I said no and asked her a few questions; she sent me a sample and the rest is history! After several weeks of eating it I was so impressed with the nutrition of the food that I decided to start up my own business helping people with this amazing food.

I asked Megan to share a little information about MS and her findings on Mila and this is what she said….

“Mila is a whole, raw, plant-based superfood source of omega 3 fatty acids…and this superfood may be helpful for many health conditions, including Multiple Sclerosis.  While studies using omega 3 fish oil in MS have had conflicting results about benefit to modifying disease progression and decreasing fatigue, anecdotally, many people find Mila to be helpful in managing symptoms of MS.  Some of the more common symptoms of MS that may be helped by Mila include fatigue, pain, and depression.  Suggested diets for MS, like the Swank Diet and the Gold Coast Cure, are heavily plant-based, and recommend omega 3 supplementation.  I support Mila because the addition of this superfood to the Standard American Diet (appropriately nicknamed SAD) will add health benefits to anyone living with (or without) a chronic disease!  People with MS are more prone to other medical conditions like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, etc. because of the potential for a sedentary lifestyle.  By adding Mila into your diet, you are using food to increase your health!  It’s kind of a no-brainer…food IS medicine!  It is important to understand that Mila should not take the place of a disease modifying therapy, and that it’s use should be discussed with your health care provider, just like any supplement.  The National MS Society has a nice overview about omega 3 supplementation in MS, but this review is based on fish oil.  The benefits of Mila in the form of protein, fiber, and other minerals, are profoundly different than those of fish oil.  The link for the MS Society review is as follows:

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/living-with-multiple-sclerosis/healthy-living/nutirtion-and-diet/the-omega-3-factor/index.aspx

Many thanks to Megan for taking time out of her busy day in Neurology to share some information with us!

Do you know anyone in your life that suffers from a neurological disorder?  Mila may be able to help them just like it helped my mom!

This dip is a fabulous way to get Mila into your diet – especially if you love garlic! For those that aren’t as fond, feel free to cut back to one clove.  The hearty black beans and Mila soak up all those delicious spices and make for a satisfying appetizer.  Try it as a sandwich spread or as a snack with dip fresh veggies or pita chips.

Garlicky Black Bean Mila Dip

Garlicky Black Bean Mila Dip

Serves 10
Vegan, Gluten Free
Printable Recipe

Ingredients

2 Tbsp Mila
1 (14.5oz/411 grams) can black beans, drained and rinsed
3 cloves garlic
2 Tbsp EVOO
3/4 tsp coarse sea salt
Fresh ground pepper
1 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp ground paprika
1/4 tsp dried thyme
Pinch of cayenne
1/2 cup water

Directions

1. Blend all ingredients well in a food processor, blender or magic bullet.

Nutrition Facts
8 Servings
Amount Per Serving 

Calories 84.0
Total Fat 7.9 g
Saturated Fat 0.9 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 5.1 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 147.1 mg
Potassium 48.3 mg
Total Carbohydrate 2.4 g
Dietary Fiber 1.6 g
Sugars 0.1 g
Protein 1.0 g 

Vitamin A 1.7 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 1.8 %
Vitamin C 1.6 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 4.2 %
Calcium 3.4 %
Copper 2.0 %
Folate 0.3 %
Iron 5.4 %
Magnesium 2.4 %
Manganese 6.6 %
Niacin 1.0 %
Pantothenic Acid 0.2 %
Phosphorus 3.5 %
Riboflavin 0.5 %
Selenium 1.2 %
Thiamin 1.9 %
Zinc 0.9 % 

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Aug 192012
 

Easy Mexican Mila Tortilla Bake

Easy Mexican Mila Tortilla Bake

 

Friday night was my second wine and Mila soirée.
We laughed, we talked nutrition, we drank and we ate dishes made with Mila.

All is quiet after work – waiting for my friends to arrive!
 
What is Mila?
(Those of you that follow me regularly already know but for those of you that are new, here is the info.)
 
Mila is an organically grown, non-genetically modified blend of chia seed that is cold pressed and sliced to make it more bio-available. 
 
It is RAW, GLUTEN FREE, AND VEGAN, perfect for cooking and baking.
 
It is super high in OMEGA 3s – equal to 6 to 10 fish oil pills per serving.  
 
A single serving also has FIVE GRAMS OF FIBER, more antioxidants than blueberries, more iron than spinach and many more benefits.
 
This little seed has anti-inflammatory properties, is excellent for brain function, energy, elimination, sleep and the best part?  It’s a FOOD!
 
My friend Jodi and my mom Diane.
We discussed the fact that Mila is a FOOD, not a pill, supplement, shake, powder or bar. It does more than just anti-aging or help you lose weight – it offers so much more! The nutrition of this food is amazing; it has 3000mg Omega 3s, antioxidants, 5 grams of fiber and only 70 calories. It will absorb many times its weight in liquid to help you feel full as well as offer tons of plant based vitamins and phytonutrients. Many shakes and pill supplements state that they have more nutrients than ten oranges, three pounds of kale, a whole salmon – blah, blah, blah.  When it comes down to it, your body is going to recognize the nutrients in an actual food much faster than a man made pill, shake or smoothie.
 
Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. — Hippocrates, father of medicine, 431 B.C.
 
Da Food

I also love the fact that Mila can be used as an egg replacer for baked goods – which is awesome because my daughter is allergic to eggs.  Instead of using a powdered egg substitute, this is a great way to both bind and add all the benefits I listed above.

Lots o’ Glorious Wine

I made my world famous seven layer dip – with Mila mixed into the black beans.

Vegan 7 Layer Dip with Mila and Cashew Sour Cream

These cookies were baked with Mila – super soft and chewy.

Oatmeal, Raisin and Almond Cookies made with Mila

My mom brought a strawberry spinach salad with a red wine and Mila vinaigrette.

Strawberry Spinach Salad with Red Wine and  Mila Vinaigrette

Jodi contributed a cheesy rice with Mila.

Cheesy Rice with Mila

A great time was had by all! A special thanks to my mentor Rachel, Megan who shared the first bag of Mila with me, my fabulous team members, Diane, Jodi, Suzanne, Chris and a long distance hug to Cara, thanks to those who stopped by and congratulations to my friend Jen who is the newest member of the team!!

Some of the fabulous ladies.
Mom enjoying her glass of wine.
 
Finally, the grand finale, my Mexican style tortilla bake - a super easy version of a lasagna. This versatile dish can be made vegan and gluten free or made with any regular tortillas you like, and any shredded cheese you have on hand.  This was an AWESOME way to slip Mila into my family’s diet.  Both my hubby and daughter polished off their serving and asked for more – little did they know they got half their day’s supply of Mila!
 

Instead of beef, I added a can of Amy’s Chili; it added tons of flavor and heartiness without the meat.  The tomatoes created a rich sauce and the black beans and fajita seasoning tie the whole dish together with a Mexican flair.  This one is definitely going under the favorites.  It is one of those casseroles that get even better the next day.

Want to try Mila for yourself?  Click HERE!

Easy Mexican Tortilla Bake with Mila

Easy Mexican Tortilla Bake with Mila

Vegan, Gluten Free
Serves 4
 

Ingredients

1 can (14.5oz) chili, I used Amy’s Medium Vegan Chili
1 can (14.5oz) black beans, drained and rinsed
2-4 scoops Mila
1 28 oz can diced tomatoes of choice (I used Muir Glen Fire Roasted, diced tomatoes with chilies), drained
2 Tbsp adobo or fajita seasoning (be sure to use a from scratch version or check the label for gluten free)
1 pkg (10oz) rice tortillas (or for non-gluten free use any you like)
1 cup shredded Daiya cheese (or any shredded cheese of choice)

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350F.  Mix chili, beans, Mila, diced tomatoes and fajita seasoning in a medium bowl.

2. Spray a 9×13 with cooking spray.  Cut the tortillas in strips and layer on layer on the bottom of the baking pan.  Top with 1/2 the bean/Mila mixture, spreading with spatula, repeat.  Top with cheese, cover and bake 25 minutes or until heated through.

**This also freezes well!  Simply use two 8×8 pans and do not add the cheese to the half you are freezing.  Wrap tightly after layering and freeze for up to 1 month.  When ready to heat, bring to room temp, top with cheese and bake at 350F for 25 minutes or until heated through.

Nutrition Facts (with Mila)
8 Servings
Amount Per Serving

Calories 296.5
Total Fat 8.7 g
Saturated Fat 1.3 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1.6 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 664.1 mg
Potassium 197.7 mg
Total Carbohydrate 42.1 g
Dietary Fiber 10.3 g
Sugars 4.5 g
Protein 11.3 g

Vitamin A 11.4 %
Vitamin B-6 6.5 %
Vitamin C 32.9 %
Calcium 8.2 %
Copper 6.5 %
Folate 16.0 %
Iron 18.1 %
Magnesium 12.5 %
Manganese 15.0 %
Niacin 6.1 %
Pantothenic Acid 4.0 %
Phosphorus 16.5 %
Riboflavin 1.5 %
Selenium 0.7 %
Thiamin 12.0 %
Zinc 5.2 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Aug 102012
 

I just finished the book, The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker.  “On a seemingly ordinary Saturday in a California suburb, Julia and her family awake to discover, along with the rest of the world, that the rotation of the earth has suddenly begun to slow. The days and nights grow longer and longer, gravity is affected, the environment is thrown into disarray. Yet as she struggles to navigate an ever-shifting landscape, Julia is also coping with the normal disasters of everyday life—the fissures in her parents’ marriage, the loss of old friends, the hopeful anguish of first love, the bizarre behavior of her grandfather who, convinced of a government conspiracy, spends his days obsessively cataloging his possessions. As Julia adjusts to the new normal, the slowing inexorably continues.”

Society is based on a 24 hour day; businesses, schools and even our sleep patterns, Karen speculates on how this all would change when the days stretch on for 48 hours, then 72 hours and more.  During the nights the plants begin dying for lack of light, the days heat up to super hot levels, but still life goes on – people scrambling to build greenhouses with artificial light and stock up on necessities as they begin to run out of food. 

The story really got me thinking; how are we going to feed the world in future generations?  Currently, one BILLION people are starving and 9 million die of hunger each year.   Right now, the world’s population is at around 7 billion people.  What happens when we get to 9 billion in the year 2050?  That is in 38 years.

According to ecologist Catherine Badgley of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor (U.M.), we already grow enough food to feed the entire population; it’s just the accessibility and quality of food.  Much of it is going to feed animals and soon bio fuel may even compete with animals for consumption of what is grown.

The US EPA states that the United States is the largest producer of corn in the world with 400,000 farms focused on this one crop.  80% of this yield is used to feed livestock, poultry and fish and only 12% is consumed directly or indirectly in food substances like high fructose corn syrup.

Source

The US has the highest percentage of arable land on the globe; of that (at the time of the study), about 382 million acres is used for crops and 525 million acres is used for livestock – their numbers contributing significantly to pollution, deforestation and methane emissions globally. “USEPA’s 1998 National Water Quality Inventory indicates that agricultural operations, including animal feeding operations (AFOs), are a significant source of water pollution in the U.S. States estimate that agriculture contributes in part to the impairment of at least 170,750 river miles, 2,417,801 lake acres, and 1,827 estuary square miles Agriculture was reported to be the most common pollutant of rivers and streams.”

The facts and statistics are mind boggling and disheartening.  What can one person do?  Eat more plants and whole, unprocessed foods.  Beans contribute nitrogen to the soil and organic vegetables and grains grown without pesticide hold  more than 1000 pounds of carbon per acre, while non-organic farms can release carbon into the air.  

Secondly, support local organic farms like KYV farm, local businesses that promote the use of produce from these farms – such as the Manatee Cafe, the Floridian and Casa Maya, and organizations such as Slow Food.  Together we can drive change!

Tip: Preparing simple rice and beans on a weekend is a great way to make super fast meals throughout the week.  Eat them alone with sautéed vegetables, add them to quesadillas or burritos or  pat them into healthy burgers.

Vegetable Stirfry with Rice and Beans
Serves 4
Vegan, Gluten Free

Ingredients

1 Tbsp oil
4 cups chopped mixed vegetables (I used green bell pepper,onion, carrot, garlic, tomato, mushrooms)
1 tsp favorite seasoning mixture (I used a mix of garlic and onion powder, salt, oregano, nutritional yeast, mustard and paprika)
Bragg Liquid Aminos, to taste (or soy sauce or Tamari but will not be soy free)
2 cups cooked beans
2 cups cooked brown rice

Directions

1. Heat oil over medium high heat; add vegetables and sauté until soft, about 7 to 10 minutes; season with favorite seasoning mixture.  Add liquid aminos, to taste.  Stir in beans and rice.

Nutrition Facts
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving

Calories 154.7
Total Fat 1.0 g
Saturated Fat 0.2 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.2 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 67.0 mg
Potassium 491.1 mg
Total Carbohydrate 31.2 g
Dietary Fiber 6.8 g
Sugars 2.9 g
Protein 6.8 g

Vitamin A 81.0 %
Vitamin B-12 0.1 %
Vitamin B-6 12.2 %
Vitamin C 52.4 %
Vitamin D 3.3 %
Vitamin E 2.5 %
Calcium 3.6 %
Copper 10.8 %
Folate 21.5 %
Iron 8.4 %
Magnesium 11.0 %
Manganese 18.8 %
Niacin 7.6 %
Pantothenic Acid 5.6 %
Phosphorus 10.9 %
Riboflavin 8.4 %
Selenium 3.9 %
Thiamin 12.5 %
Zinc 5.2 %


*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.