Oct 222013
 

One taste of this Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries and you will have a new Thanksgiving tradition.

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

 I typically try to stick with whole foods as much as possible but this Tofurkey roast was one of those splurge items that really neat to try.

When I was asked to create this recipe and take photos I realized that knew of the Tofurkey name but knew little about the background of the company so I surfed around and found out a bit more.  Wow! I love a passionate, family run company.

 Turtle Island Foods is the company that creates this roast and this is their very interesting story!

Turtle Island foods was created in 1980 by Seth Tibbot – a teacher and naturalist that lived in a tree house in Oregon that he rented for $25 per month.  His first product was tempeh and he focused solely on that for 15 years!

“At Turtle Island Foods, our Tofurky® and tempeh products are created to promote the health and vitality of both the people and the ecosystems of our “island” home. For almost 30 years we have worked to create delicious, nutritious, convenient and affordable vegetarian food that make a difference in people’s lives and have a minimal impact on our environment. We are located in Hood River, Oregon, one hour east of Portland. We make our vegetarian products in small batches using only the finest organic and natural ingredients. No preservatives, MSG or other artificial ingredients are added to our products. All of our products are kosher, vegan, and made with organic soybeans and/or organic tofu. We are a family owned and operated company.”

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

 All of the Turtle Island products are vegan and non-GMO.  For ingredients they prefer to use organic tofu and soy instead of soy powders and isolates.  They actually smoke their foods in real smoke houses instead of using liquid smoke.

Seth’s family supported him in growing his business so he was finally able to move into a larger facility a few years prior to 1995 – the year that Seth’s company hit it big with the sale of 500 Tofurkey roasts just like the one pictured here and was even featured on the Today Show!  His products helped vegetarians that felt left out on Thanksgiving Day.

In 1999 Ellen DeGeneres started promoting the brand and the name “Tofurkey” because of it’s humor factor. Turtle Island believes that year they enjoyed over 1.5 million in free publicity!

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Turtle Island Foods is the last independently run, family owned and operated soy food brand in the US.  Sadly (but not surprisingly) the other small soy food companies have been picked off by the giants such as Dean Foods, ConAgra, Kraft and others.

WHY are they hanging in there and doing all this?  Because they care about your health and the health of animals and the environment. Check out the facts they have listed such as:

If 1/3 of Americans switched from eating one 3 ½-ounce serving of beef, one egg, and a one-ounce serving of cheese each day to a mix of vegetables, fruit, beans, and whole grains:
(United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization, 2006.)

  • Acres of cropland spared: 180 million (an area larger than the state of Texas)
  • Tons of pesticides eliminated: 9,375
  • Tons of fertilizer eliminated: 2 million
  • Tons of manure eliminated*: 570 million (* Livestock manure and flatulence generate 30-40% of total methane emissions from human-influenced activities.)
Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Ok so we all love knowing about the background of the company – but how does it taste?!

I can officially say I was deliciously surprised.  I have tried a few other products that are meant to replicate that texture of meat and have not been impressed; however, with this recipe I was VERY impressed. Not only with the mixture of the flavors with the caramelized onion and dried cherries, but with the texture of the Tofurkey and the taste of the moist wild rice stuffing inside.

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

I’ll definitely be using the caramelized onion mixture for other types of recipes. It would make a great sandwich topping or maybe over a grain and bean dish – the opportunities are endless!

What is your favorite Vegan holiday item?

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

For other delicious Thanksgiving recipes try these!
Thanksgiving Bean Burger

Apple Mushroom Stuffing Hash

All Natural Kale and Flax Cornbread Muffins

Coconut Pumpkin Pie

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Tender Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Tart Dried Cherries

Roast Tofurkey with Balsamic Caramelized Onions and Dried Cherries

Reprinted with permission from Turtle Island Foods
Serves 6
Vegan

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, sliced very thin
1 cup dried sour cherries
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
4 tablespoons apple cider
1 Tofurky roast
** Be sure Tofurkey is thawed in refrigerator for 24 hours before beginning recipe!

Directons:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large skillet, heat olive oil on medium heat. Add onion, cherries, brown sugar and vinegar and cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft. Stir in mustard and apple cider, and simmer for two more minutes. Place Tofurky roast on sheet of heavy-duty aluminum foil, and spread with the onion mixture. Wrap roast snugly with the foil. Place in roasting pan, and place on center rack of oven. Bake for 45 minutes. Uncover roast for last 10 minutes of baking.

Nutrition Facts
6 Servings
Amount Per Serving 

Calories 307.3
Total Fat 6.6 g
Saturated Fat 0.2 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.1 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 529.0 mg
Potassium 178.1 mg
Total Carbohydrate 35.2 g
Dietary Fiber 3.5 g
Sugars 17.1 g
Protein 26.8 g

Vitamin A 12.6 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 1.6 %
Vitamin C 2.8 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 1.1 %
Calcium 16.9 %
Copper 1.3 %
Folate 1.2 %
Iron 11.9 %
Magnesium 0.9 %
Manganese 2.8 %
Niacin 0.2 %
Pantothenic Acid 0.3 %
Phosphorus 1.0 %
Riboflavin 0.4 %
Selenium 0.3 %
Thiamin 0.8 %
Zinc 0.3 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

 

Apr 162013
 

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies
Open your mind……

“Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” ― Michael Pollan, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies over Fresh Citrus Salsa and Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies over Fresh Citrus Salsa and Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

“Many people know that animals around the world are treated badly, yet they turn their minds away.” - Ruby Roth, Vegan is Love

So I say…..open your mind to what is going on in factory farms. 

“Were the walls of our meat industry to become transparent, literally or even figuratively, we would not long continue to raise, kill, and eat animals the way we do.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
 

“I would NEVER.”  Some people say.
Never give up meat. Give up dairy. Eat tofu.

I do believe I heard that out of my husband’s mouth.

(But curiosity got the best of him.)

It looks like chicken.

“Hey! It’s pretty good!”

Score.

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies over Fresh Citrus Salsa and Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies over Fresh Citrus Salsa and Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

How did I manage to do this and WHY?

Let’s start with the why.

For the same reason I would pre-prep and pre-make dishes for my CSA….so folks would at least try it.  Even ONE meat and dairy free meal helps your body, the environment and, of course, the animals that were not eaten.

“But that’s the challenge — to change the system more than it changes you.”
Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies over Fresh Citrus Salsa and Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies over Fresh Citrus Salsa and Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

The HOW.

Tips on how to make tofu look like chicken.

Step 1: Press well.  Do this the day before you are going to eat it or at least a few hours in advance.  I LOVE my tofu xpress, or you can simply wrap the tofu in thick paper towels and a kitchen towel, place it between two plates and weight down the top plate with a very heavy book and/or soup cans.  If you are pressing it overnight, place in the fridge; if not, it is fine to leave on the counter.

Step 2: Cut around the entire tofu to remove any flat planes and edges – think chicken breast. Save all the little shreds to season and throw on a salad.

Step 3: Now cut the tofu into similarly sized but asymmetrical pieces.

Step 4: Run your knife along the flat planes making small downward cuts to shred the edges a bit and then throw the tofu in the marinade.  See the below video and I promise to get a better one soon! Stay tuned…..

(All these steps will also help the marinade seep in a bit better.)

Ever wondered how to disguise tofu? This very humorous, last minute (and shaky) video shows you how. 
Warning: The videographer was my 4 year old.

 Now that all the nuts and bolts are out of the way, let’s get down to the food.

The weather is getting warmer and people are ready to start grilling!  There is nothing like a nice crisp char on some veggies and a mouth-watering, marinated protein-of-choice (tempeh would be great too) - perfect with cool salsa and creamy avocado.  This whole concoction, nestled in a bed of aromatic-nutty cilantro and sunflower seed pesto, is a perfect medley of flavor, texture and temperature.

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies over Fresh Citrus Salsa and Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies over Fresh Citrus Salsa and Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto 

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies over Fresh Citrus Salsa and Cilantro Sun Flower Seed Pesto  

 ___________________________________

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies

 Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies

Serves 6
Vegan, Gluten Free
Printable Recipe
Tip: Press the tofu overnight and then marinate during the day.

Ingredients

1 block organic, extra firm tofu, pressed 1 hour to overnight
2 Tbsp + 2 tsp adobo seasoning
1 Tbsp + 2 tsp olive oil
2 fresh zucchini, sliced
1 onion, quartered and cut into chunks
5oz button mushrooms

Adobo Seasoning Recipe
Notes: You will definitely have left over.
This step can be skipped by purchasing pre-mixed adobo seasoning.
2 tsp each; garlic powder, black pepper, onion powder, cumin, dried oregano
1 tsp chili powder
1 Tbsp paprika
2 Tbsp salt

Directions

1. Mix 2 Tbsp adobo seasoning and 1 Tbsp olive oil in a large bowl; cut tofu into chunks (see tip on how to make tofu look like chicken) and add to bowl; toss to coat and set aside for at least an hour or the day.

2. Preheat grill to medium high; season the vegetables with remaining 2 tsp adobo seasoning and 2 tsp olive oil; toss to coat.

3. Thread veggies and tofu onto skewers in an alternating pattern; spray with organic, non-stick spray.

4. Grill until nice char marks appear and vegetables are soft but not mushy; 5-10 minutes on one side and 5 or so minutes on the next.

Full Nutrition Info

Fresh Citrus Salsa

Fresh Citrus Salsa

Fresh Citrus Salsa

Serves 6
Vegan, Gluten Free
Printable Recipe

Ingredients

2 tomatoes, chopped
1 navel orange, peeled and chopped
1/4 red onion, chopped
Juice 1 lime
1 avocado, seeded and chopped
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
Dash coarse sea salt

Directions

1. Mix all ingredients in a medium bowl.

Full Nutrition Info

Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

Cilantro Sunflower Seed Pesto

Serves 6
Vegan, Gluten Free
Printable Recipe

Ingredients

1 cup fresh cilantro
1 Tbsp chopped onion
2 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 cup roasted sunflower seeds
1/8 – 1/4 tsp coarse sea salt (depending on taste)
1/4 cup water

Directions

1. Mix all ingredients in Magic Bullet or blender.

!Full Nutrition Info

Enjoy this grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies

Feb 042013
 

For my Kale and Tofu Sandwich scroll down!

____________________________________________

And the winner of the giveaway is #13 Anna Rabhan! Please check out her article at her website the Organic Adventurer on Palm Oil and Orangutans.

____________________________________________

The long ago day when I overheard people talking about the book the China Study was the day that changed my life.  I had already been leaning towards a plant based diet, but the facts about the proteins in animals and dairy scared me enough to finally make that change.  The authors studied the instances of cancer, diabetes and heart disease in populations of rural China that ate little to no animal foods. They then took these findings back and performed laboratory studies where they found they could turn on and turn off cancer cells with the addition of the protein found in milk.

Even if it isn’t true the more I ask questions and facts I learn about the treatment of animals, especially dairy cows in most of the commercial farming industry, the happier I am that I found this book and the more I celebrate plant proteins like tofu, tempeh and legumes!  Do you ever wonder…..What happens when it is time to retire that dairy cow? What happens to the male goats? What about male chicks in the egg industry?   How do we harvest down and foie gras? 

Ultimately each person is free to make their own decisions absolutely free of judgement.  I encourage all of us to simply make informed decisions.  Just like in all areas of life, it is so important to edcuate ourselves on the facts as best we can and then select what is right for us.

images

For those of you that are thinking about adding more plant based foods into your diet but don’t know what to do with tofu, the first thing you need to know is that you have to press the water out of it to get a firm texture that is reminiscent of animal protein.  You can do this by putting a bunch of paper towels under the tofu and placing two plates, one on top and one on bottom, and topping with some weight (usually heavy books work well) for an hour up to overnight.  OR you can get this super easy tofu press!  My tofu press I bought from TofuXpress years ago is one of my all time favorite kitchen gadgets that gets used at least weekly.  I can’t tell you how much I love this thing! No more plates and messy towels – this press will not only press the water out, you can marinate right in it!

TofuXpress Giveaway from FCC!

TofuXpress Giveaway from FCC!

I am so excited to bring you a giveaway of a TofuXpress!

This press is a $40 value and I will ship to anywhere is the continental US.

To enter for THREE chances to win – tell all your friends!

Leave one comment: Entry #1 What is your favorite kitchen gadget? (Please share the love and share this giveaway with your friends!)

Leave a second comment: Entry #2 Like Florida Coastal Cooking on facebook AND share about the giveaway (If you are already a follower, thank you! Please simply share the giveaway and leave the comment you did so.)

Leave a third comment: Entry #3 Follow Florida Coastal Cooking on Twitter and tweet about the giveaway (If you are already a follower, thank you! Please simply share the giveaway and leave the comment you did so.)

The giveaway will end in one week on Monday, February 11th, 2013 5:30AM EST

Good luck!

Saucy Kale and Tofu Sandwich

Saucy Kale and Tofu Sandwich

This is one of my favorite ways to eat pressed tofu – SIMPLE, with kale, seasonings and a great dressing.  Lately a kale, tofu and Annie’s Light Goddess dressing salad is all I bring for lunch. The great thing is that the hearty kale can stand up to being dressed that morning so I don’t have to worry about it turning to mush and at the same time it can marinate to the tofu. Yesterday for lunch I decided to try it as a sandwich and it was really good. The toasted bun gives it a nice crunch and the flavor of the Annie’s dressing is a soy/tahini/cider vinegar base which gives it a nutty and slightly salty flavor.

It is important to season firm, pressed and uncooked tofu because, just like any animal protein, it needs some flavor.  Have you ever tried an unseasoned piece of chicken? I remember what it tastes like – bleck!

If you are not sure about leaving the tofu uncooked – you can marinate it in the dressing and then roast, grill or pan sear it.

Saucy Kale and Tofu Sandwich

Saucy Kale and Tofu Sandwich

Easy Saucy Kale and Tofu Sandwich

Serves 1
Vegan
Printable Recipe

Ingredients

1 bagel thin, I used Rudis Whole Wheat Flatz
2 curly kale leaves
1/4 block pressed organic tofu
Coarse sea salt, fresh ground pepper, to taste
1/8 tsp garlic powder
2 Tbsp Annie’s Light Goddess Dressing

Directions

1. Toast bagel thin; top with 1 kale leaf; top with tofu; sprinkle salt, pepper, garlic powder and dressing; top with remaining kale leaf.

Full Nutrition info not available for this recipe
Estimated 
225 cals
12.8 grams protein
1/2 your daily calcium
Enjoy my Easy Saucy Kale and Tofu Sandwich!

Jan 092013
 

A reflection on the importance of treating with food instead of medicine…….

KyV Farm CSA - Brussels, Broccoli, Carrots and Tomato

CSA – Brussels, Broccoli, Carrots and Tomato

By now we have all figured out that the world didn’t end in December because we are all still here. But all that talk about the world ending got people talking. What if…..

Story in In-Style this month - Sandra Lee lived through the Super Storm

Story in In-Style this month – Sandra Lee lived through the Super Storm

There WAS an emergency - a flu pandemic, a hurricane, terrorist attack, nuclear bomb….

Tofu Stir Fry

Tofu Stir Fry

I’ll share a little known fact about me – I graduated with a sociology degree so I love the study of people and especially what would happen in an extreme disaster. I just finished a thought provoking book called One Second After by William R Forstchen. The setting is in North Carolina and the US is struck by an EMP, or electro magnetic pulse – this documented scenario can happen from a solar flare, but in this case, a nuclear device was detonated in the atmosphere high above the US – so there is no risk of radiation, but it fries all electronics and computers. In the book, the main character, John, is simply going about his day when he hears his daughter’s CD player stop playing music and the fan slowly stops turning. That is it. Next they realize the noise from the highway has stopped. All electronics with computer chips stop working. This sounds not too bad right?

Think about this. No one knows what happened because all communication is cut off.  Everyone was waiting to find out what happened and what to do.  If this happened – phones and radios don’t work so there is no communication, ATMs and banks are useless, cars stop working, pace makers stop, back-up generators and the computers at drug stores and super markets are dead and there is no way to truck the food, medicine and supplies that communities now rely on for daily deliveries. The people stranded on the highway, just driving through the area don’t know what is going on. Many of them need medications and food so they must walk into the nearest town – there are people that are so out of shape and unhealthy, they CAN’T walk for miles, some that make it to the pharmacy can’t get their meds because there is no access to the money on their check cards or their records.

For anyone on pharmaceuticals such as statins or other heart medication that could have been considerably helped through diet and exercise – in the book, they don’t make it. They can’t get access to the medications that they would normally simply buy when they needed it. People get cuts or ear infections – there are no antibiotics, so these minor injuries result in catastrophic infections. Any meds that needed to be refrigerated also degrade such as anyone with insulin dependence. How long could this loss of electronics affect us? Months or even years.

Also, consider this. In the past most humans had skills and trades. They were carpenters, farmers, seamstresses and blacksmiths….they had something they could barter with. Maybe some wool in exchange for food. Clothing in exchange for some tools.

How many of us in the US can grow our own food now? (Francisco and Vivian at my CSA, KYV Farm would have LOTS of new friends.) Sew? Cook? Do carpentry? Many people drive somewhere in our cars, sit all day on computers, drive home, go through the drive through, sit on the couch, watch TV, check facebook etc.  What if we were at work when this happened? Do you have a crisis plan for your, your family and your children if communication is cut off?

Tofu Stir Fry

Tofu Stir Fry

At home, is there anything in your pantry you could eat if you didn’t have access to the grocery store? I’m not talking a package of Doritos. I’m talking FOOD. Rice. Beans. Nut butters. Cans of veggies and fruit. Things that would keep in any disaster and would store without refrigeration. Meats and dairy will not keep (unless you count spam but that isn’t really food, ha!). How about a way to get fresh water? If the electronics stopped working, my well wouldn’t work. How would I get fresh water to drink, bathe and flush the commode?

Lots of Dry Beans

Lots of Dry Beans

I’m not trying to worry or upset you but I am trying to get you to THINK of what you would do in different situations because when I started thinking about it – I realized I’d be in big trouble.   I’m not saying I’m now a Doomsday Prepper but I do have a plan in case of disaster, a bit of extra rice and beans in the pantry, a water bottle used for hiking that filters water, and I called to get an extra bottle of my yellow Lab, Tally’s phenobarbital we use to treat her seizures.  SIMPLE!

Organized Dry Goods - Grains and Beans Etc.Stored in Recycled Glass Containers

Organized Dry Goods – Grains and Beans Etc.Stored in Recycled Glass Containers

What else can you do? Take care of any ailments you can through FOOD instead of medicine.  Start eating healthier and exercising. (I, of course, have to share info about my favorite super-food, Mila. Not only is it shelf stable, you could eat it in a disaster. This whole, raw food is what the Indians of the Copper Canyon ate on their long runs in the book born to run. Especially those of you that are nurses and doctors.  You have skills that are invaluable in daily life – in an emergency you would be even more valuable. You spend your days caring for others, please don’t forget to take care of yourselves!

I’m so thankful that we have found a way to treat my daughter’s horrendous food allergies of wheat, eggs, dairy, peanuts, cod, red 40 and more through a healthy, whole foods diet.  I used to have to get $300 tubes of steroid creams more than MONTHLY.  I’m also thankful that my family doesn’t need heart, cholesterol, blood pressure or anti-depressant medication – we have taken care of what we can by eating healthy and exercising, but my mom has Multiple Sclerosis and uses an injectable drug called Beta Seron.  What would she do in an emergency? Definitely food for thought. Americans tend to take so much for granted, myself included, but I’m becoming more aware.  Water. Food. Medicine. Washing machines. Toilet paper. Dry clothing. Toothpaste. Antibiotics. Vaccines. All these things are trucked in daily – especially in inner cities.

So many disasters already do happen and the populations in those areas would be so much better off with just a LITTLE preparedness; so I implore you to ask yourself….what if?

Just think – if you have some shelf stable tofu and some gardening skills you could make this. No gardening skills? Talk to an organic farmer and see how they do it. EASY, sweet, salty and nutty – my whole family loved this.  I used sun butter because my daughter has lots of food allergies so she could enjoy it as well.  As much as I didn’t feel like cooking when I got home, this was so simple to throw together in about ten minutes!

Tell me – have any preparations been made for an emergency or disaster? What would you do if you didn’t have access to any electronics?

Sweet and Salty Tofu Stir Fry

Sweet and Salty Tofu Stir Fry

Sweet and Salty Broccoli, Carrot and Tofu Stir Fry

Serves 4
Printable Recipe
Vegan, Gluten Free, Oil Free

Ingredients

1 block tofu, pressed
1 head broccoli, chopped (from KyV Farm)
3 carrots, chopped (from KyV Farm)
2 Tbsp Sunflower seed butter (or any nut butter you choose)
2 Tbsp agave
1 Tbsp wheat free Tamari

Optional

Red pepper flakes

Directions

1. Heat 1 Tbsp water in a wok over medium high heat; cube tofu and add, browning on two sides, about three minutes, adding 1 tsp water as needed to prevent sticking; remove from heat and set aside.

2. Heat a second Tbsp water in wok add vegetables; stir constantly until tender crisp, again adding 1 tsp water as needed to prevent sticking; about 3 to 5 minutes.

3. Add tofu back to wok and reduce heat.  Mix sunflower seed butter, agave and tamari in a small bowl; add to tofu mixture and toss to coat; serve with red pepper flakes if desired.

Nutrition Facts
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving

Calories 233.2
Total Fat 11.7 g
Saturated Fat 1.6 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 5.8 g
Monounsaturated Fat 3.6 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 365.3 mg
Potassium 801.1 mg
Total Carbohydrate 19.0 g

Dietary Fiber 7.3 g
Sugars 5.9 g
Protein 19.0 g
Vitamin A 157.2 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 18.1 %
Vitamin C 241.6 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 20.4 %
Calcium 21.1 %
Copper 21.4 %
Folate 36.8 %
Iron 21.6 %
Magnesium 37.7 %
Manganese 75.7 %
Niacin 12.9 %
Pantothenic Acid 10.3 %
Phosphorus 30.6 %
Riboflavin 15.4 %
Selenium 24.8 %
Thiamin 12.4 %
Zinc 15.9 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Aug 282012
 
Can tomato and pineapple be friends?  After tasting this recipe, I do believe they are the BEST of friends; neither overpowering the other, living in a sweet-savory harmony.

 

Pineapple Tomato Chimichurri over Teriyaki Tofu
 
And WHY would I put an Argentine chimichurri over a Japanese teriyaki? Because it works!  These flavors can go hand in hand – in this case it’s best not to discriminate – trust me. 
 
Pineapple Tomato Chimichurri over Teriyaki Tofu
 
If you aren’t a tofu lover – this chimichurri will go well over any of your favorite proteins or even used as salsa.  And the second great thing is that this is one fresh topping that doesn’thave cilantro but is still AMAZING. In my experience, there are two types of people in the world.  Those that love cilantro and those that hate it.  Cilantro is one of those ingredients that either gets a, it’s so fresh, I love it!, or a, It’s the most disgusting thing ever and tastes like soap.

 
With this recipe you can please everyone on your list.
 
Pineapple Tomato Chimichurri over Teriyaki Tofu

Pineapple Tomato Chimichurri over Teriyaki Tofu

Serves 4
Vegan, Gluten Free
 
Ingredients
 
1 cup chopped fresh pineapple
2 tomatoes, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
2 Tbsp minced fresh oregano
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar 
1/4 tsp sea salt
Dash ground cumin and dried thyme, to taste
1 block organic, firm tofu, pressed of water
1/3 cup Teriyaki marinade, (OrganicVille )
 
Directions
 
1. Cut tofu into 4 “steaks”; pour marinade over evenly and marinate 1 hour to 24 hours.
 
2. Preheat oven to 400F.  Place tofu on baking sheet sprayed with organic non stick spray; bake 15 minutes; flip and broil on high, 5 minutes.
 
3. Mix pineapple through cumin and thyme in a medium bowl.**
 
4. Topeach tofu steak with 1/4 salsa mixture.**Pineapple mixture can also be prepared ahead the night before, while the tofu is marinating.

 
Pineapple Chimmichurri
Nutrition Facts

4 Servings
Amount Per Serving

Calories 91.0
Total Fat 7.3 g
Saturated Fat 1.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1.1 g
Monounsaturated Fat 5.1 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 151.1 mg
Potassium 146.9 mg
Total Carbohydrate 7.5 g
Dietary Fiber 1.0 g
Sugars 4.3 g
Protein 0.7 g

Vitamin A 10.4 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 4.5 %
Vitamin C 24.6 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 1.1 %
Calcium 1.5 %
Copper 4.0 %
Folate 3.7 %
Iron 3.6 %
Magnesium 3.1 %
Manganese 36.4 %
Niacin 2.1 %
Pantothenic Acid 1.7 %
Phosphorus 1.6 %
Riboflavin 2.1 %
Selenium 1.0 %
Thiamin 4.1 %
Zinc 0.9 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Tofu (Estimated because much of the marinade is poured off)
Estimated Nutrition Facts
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving

Calories 129.2
Total Fat 7.1 g
Saturated Fat 1.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 4.0 g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.6 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 571.4 mg
Potassium 151.3 mg
Total Carbohydrate 7.2 g
Dietary Fiber 0.5 g
Sugars 4.6 g
Protein 11.8 g

Jul 052012
 
Cajun Fu Fingers with Roasted Summer Squash and Tomatoes and Creamy Spiced Mustard on the Side

With this being my second tofu post in a row I got to thinking about all the negative press that soy gets – so I googled “is soy safe” and there is a LOT of info out there.

I looked for reputable sources and found a great article at the Mayo Clinic where many of the claims are rated according to the amount of scientific evidence available.

The claims that have the most scientific evidence are that soy tofu is high in protein and is an acceptable source and secondly that it can reduce blood levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein as well as triglycerides.
A while back I had also come across an article in Eating Well by Amy Patural that stated soy can cut down on hot flashes in menopausal women and can decrease the chances for prostate cancer in men by 30%.  The concerns about breast health, according to Mark Messina, Ph.D., adjunct associate professor at Loma Linda University and executive director of the Soy Nutrition Institute, are also unfounded.  In fact, kids that eat one serving of edamame or tofu per day decreased their chances for breast cancer by 50% later in life – however there was no benefit for adults.

Another Eating Well article states; Researchers still don’t know whether isoflavones—the compounds in soy that act as weak estrogens in the body—spur the growth of tumors by acting like estrogen or prevent breast cancer by competing with the breast’s natural estrogen. Scientists who looked at the effect individual isoflavones from soy had on breast-cancer cells in test tubes have found both results.”

The bottom line is that one to two servings per day – such as half cup of edamame or one cup of soy milk, is good for you; however, do keep in mind that genetically modified soy is in almost all fast food (the burgers and buns) and in most processed foods. Check the labels for soy ingredients. You might be eating more than you think and it’s best to eat everything in moderation – especially if you are eating anything genetically modified.

The supporters of GMOs state that there is no evidence that GMO foods can hurt us; however, they don’t take into account the increase in food allergies over the years that have increased in direct correlation with the development of GMO crops.
My suggestion is to always choose organic in the case of ingesting soy to ensure you aren’t eating any genetically modified organisms.
Cajun Fu Fingers with Roasted Summer Squash and Tomatoes and Creamy Spiced Mustard on the Side
Cajun Fu Fingers with Roasted Summer Squash and Tomatoes and
Creamy Spiced Mustard on the Side
Vegan
Ingredients
1 Block organic extra firm tofu, pressed and cut into sticks
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1/3 cup unsweet non-dairy milk
1/4 tsp Cajun Seasoning blend
3/4 cup crushed flake cereal or breadcrumb
Roasted Veggies
1 cup cherry tomatoes
1 summer squash
1/2 onion
Cajun Seasoning blend
Spiced Mustard
2 Tbsp reduced fat Vegenaise
2 Tbsp coarse ground mustard such as Grey Poupon
Cajun Seasoning blend, to taste
Directions
1. Preheat oven to 400F.  Mix vinegar and non-dairy milk (I used unsweet almond) in a small bowl. Dip tofu sticks in, season with Cajun seasoning and roll in cereal or breadcrumb.  Place on baking sheet prepared with cooking spray.
2. Place veggie mixture on separate tray prepared with cooking spray.  Spray tops of veggies with cooking spray; sprinkle with Cajun Seasoning.  Place both tofu tray and veggie tray into oven for 20 minutes, flipping halfway through.
3. Meanwhile mix spiced mustard blend in a small bowl. 
4. Serve 1/4 tofu, 1/4 veggie and 1 tbsp spiced mustard per plate.

Nutrition Facts
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving

Calories 188.0
Total Fat 10.3 g
Saturated Fat 1.1 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 4.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 3.3 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 372.4 mg
Potassium 313.1 mg
Total Carbohydrate 14.0 g
Dietary Fiber 3.1 g
Sugars 3.4 g
Protein 13.4 g

Vitamin A 2.6 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 9.4 %
Vitamin C 10.0 %
Vitamin D 3.1 %
Vitamin E 6.5 %
Calcium 14.9 %
Copper 11.7 %
Folate 13.3 %
Iron 27.2 %
Magnesium 25.6 %
Manganese 58.8 %
Niacin 4.7 %
Pantothenic Acid 4.6 %
Phosphorus 23.1 %
Riboflavin 5.3 %
Selenium 18.4 %
Thiamin 21.5 %
Zinc 14.2 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Jun 302012
 
Saturday Quick Post!

Tofy Satay

 
This was one of those dinners that came out so great that I wanted to save the list of ingredients but I hadn’t measured everything out.  If you typically follow a recipe to the letter (not mentioning any names, MOM), I encourage you to try this one out and just wing it by utilizing your sense of taste!
 
Mix the ingredients, taste it, and think – does it need more salt?  Add some more Braggs (or soy, or tamari). Too sweet?  Balance it out with some more vinegar.  Just experiment!
 
Also, my original intent was to skewer the tofu but cutting the block into tofu steaks saved time so I went with it – and it came out perfectly. Use the skewers if you are going for presentation.
 
Tip: This marinade can be used for any protein.  You can leave it over night, for just an hour or simply brush it on – so versatile!
 
Tofu Satay without the Skewer
 Tofu Satay with Steamed Broccoli
(Without the skewer!)
Serves 4
Vegan, Gluten Free
 
Ingredients
 
Tofu
1 block extra firm tofu
Dark sesame oil (or any oil you have on hand)
Agave (or honey)
Sunflower seed butter (or peanut butter, or tahini)
Bragg Liquid Aminos (or soy, or tamari)
Rice vinegar (or apple cider vinegar or white)
2 cloves fresh garlic, minced
 
Broccoli
1 head broccoli, chopped
Bragg Liquid Aminos (or soy, or tamari)
Rice vinegar (or apple cider vinegar or white)
Agave (or honey)
Water
 
Directions
 
1. Press water from the tofu then slice in half and then through the center into “steaks” or however you like to slice your tofu – any way will work. 
 
2. Preheat grill to medium high.  Mix about 1 tbsp each –  sesame oil through vinegar; stir well; mix in garlic.  Adjust to taste.  Add tofu and coat all sides; save the remaining for dipping sauce.  Grill to desired temperature.
 
3. Meanwhile steam the broccoli, about 10 minutes; as that cooks whisk about 1 tsp each liquid aminos through agave and add about 1 tbsp water; adjust to taste. Pour over steamed broccoli. 
 
4. Serve one slice tofu and 1/4 broccoli mixture on each of four plates with a side of left over marinade.
Jun 152012
 
The day I was reading through my VegNews magazine I happened to be relaxing on a sunny day, kicking back in a lawn chair, clad in bathing suit and floppy hat when I came across the recipe for tofu feta.  It sounded so intriguing that I got up and made it right then. Little did I know, the tofu I had in my fridge happened to be the pre-cubed version – what a time savings!
I threw it together and have been eating it on a whole variety of dishes; anywhere you would put feta cheese. The extra firm tofu and salty brine are really satisfying when eaten along with Greek dishes. It’s not real feta, mind you, but it’s a great vegan sub if you have cut out cheese. In addition, there are tons of benefits to eating organic, non-GMO soy in moderation. They have lots of the 9 essential amino acids, lots of lean protein and calcium.
As for the salad, I mixed an oil free version for my friend Suzanne at work to try as well since she is an oil free vegan. The sun ripe tomatoes and cool cucumbers were perfect with just a squeeze of lemon, salt and pepper; I didn’t even miss the oil.
Enjoy!
Greek Salad with Herbed Tofu Feta
Inspired by Veg News Herbed Feta and Classic Greek Salad
Serves 4
Vegan, Gluten Free
Ingredients
Tofu Feta
1 16oz package organic, extra firm, cubed tofu (or you can buy the block and cut it into 1/2 inch cubes)
2 cups water
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
3 tsp sea salt
1 1/2 Tbsp Italian seasoning blend (with basil and oregano)
Raw Tomato Salad
2 fresh tomatoes, chopped
1 large cucumber, chopped
1/4 red onion, sliced
Handful parsley, chopped
Dressing
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 tsp agave nectar
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp fresh ground pepper
(2 Tbsp olive oil optional)
Directions
1. Heat all ingredients for feta in a saucepan heated over low heat; simmer about 30 minutes.  Cool and refrigerate overnight.  The longer you keep it in the fridge marinating the better it gets!
2. Toss the salad mixture in a large bowl.
3. Whisk the dressing ingredients in a small bowl.
4. Drain the feta and add to salad bowl, pour dressing over evenly and toss mixture gently.
*Alternatively you can mix the salad and dressing and simply add the desired amount of feta on top.
Salad Nutrition Facts
4 Servings

Amount Per Serving

Calories 37.9
Total Fat 0.4 g
Saturated Fat 0.1 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.2 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.1 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 302.7 mg
Potassium 342.0 mg
Total Carbohydrate 8.4 g
Dietary Fiber 1.9 g
Sugars 1.3 g
Protein 1.5 g

Vitamin A 20.9 % 
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 5.8 %
Vitamin C 30.9 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 2.4 %
Calcium 2.2 %
Copper 5.1 %
Folate 7.6 %
Iron 4.8 %
Magnesium 5.2 %
Manganese 8.4 %
Niacin 4.0 %
Pantothenic Acid 3.8 %
Phosphorus 4.1 %
Riboflavin 3.8 %
Selenium 0.6 %
Thiamin 5.2 %
Zinc 1.9 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.




Tofu Feta Nutrition Facts

4 Servings (Or you may get more depending on how much “feta” you want.)
Amount Per Serving

Calories 116.8
Total Fat 7.1 g
Saturated Fat 1.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 4.0 g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.6 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 1,755.8 mg (sodium will actually be lower since you are draining the liquid but in creating the recipe in the builder I had to include the entire amount of salt)
Potassium 189.5 mg
Total Carbohydrate 4.9 g
Dietary Fiber 0.6 g
Sugars 1.3 g
Protein 12.0 g
Vitamin A 0.3 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 3.2 %
Vitamin C 24.3 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 0.1 %
Calcium 12.0 %
Copper 10.9 %
Folate 8.4 %
Iron 10.9 %
Magnesium 20.7 %
Manganese 54.2 %
Niacin 2.1 %
Pantothenic Acid 1.0 %
Phosphorus 18.6 %
Riboflavin 3.0 %
Selenium 18.3 %
Thiamin 4.3 %
Zinc 8.6 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Apr 252012
 
Welcome back to Wine Down Wednesday where I review a vegan dish paired with two different wines from Broadbent Selections.

For an ideal pairing we look at wines that compliment the flavors of the Roasted Moroccan Carrot dish; cinnamon, coriander and cumin.

The wines chosen to pair are
Weinert Carrascal (2007), Argentina and
Spy Valley Sauvignon Blanc (2011), New Zealand.
The Dish
At the recent Tour de Farm I picked up a gorgeous bunch of carrots, sweet onions and a few bags of potatoes - when I got home Moroccan flavors came to mind.  It would be perfect with the variety of veggies and the mixture of spices; cinnamon, coriander and cumin to compliment the natural sweetness of the carrots.  Outside there is parsley growing in my herb garden and I had some tofu and raisins on hand to round out a perfect meal.

Details about the wine.
Spy Valley Sauvignon Blanc (2011), New Zealand
Spy Valley is crafted by the Johnson Estate, a family owned winery located in Marlborough, New Zealand.  It is one of the youngest wineries I have reviewed – founded in 1993.  Overlooking the vines are two huge, white domes - a facility that gathers information on satellite communications for the US and New Zealand - hence the name, Spy Valley.

Both the wines and vineyard are certified sustainable by the New Zealand Winegrowers Sustainable Wine Growing Program which is audited each year.   Most of the Sauvignon Blanc is grown on beautiful, sunny river terraces along the Omaka River and the grapes are fermented in steel barrels.

 Weinert Carrascal (2007), Argentina
Weinert’s first vintage was made in 1977 and the Carrascal is a blend of Malbec, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon and is fermented in an underground cellar in oak French casks. The name, Carrascal, comes from the place in Mendoza where many of the wineries came together to bottle their wine in clay amphora factories.

Here is the rating info.

Categories

Category #1 – How well my dish turned out.
Category #2 – How well I like the wine.
Category #3 – Pairing notes – How well this wine pairs with the dish.


Rating Scale


Bleck -This wine is pretty bad.
Ho Hum- I could drink it if I was at a football game and there was nothing else in the cooler.
Nice -Good table wine. I would keep this in the wine cooler if it was a good value.
Yum – This is good, I would pay a fair bit more and have it for a special occasion.
Damn that’s Good – Self explanatory.
** We will use the same terminology for how the dish turned out and how well it paired.


Category #1 – The Dish

Rating of YUM. I was so pleased with how this dish turned out. Moroccan food has lots of fragrant aromatics, a melody of flavors that has good balance, with no spice overpowering the others. The result is spicy, sweet and satisfying even without a lot of fat. Roasting the vegetables imparts a touch of caramelization on the outside and for anyone new to tofu this is a perfect dish to start with – the spices coat the tofu well and the outside turns a touch crispy. I can’t wait to try this again with new vegetable variations.

Category #2 – The Wines


Sauvignon Blanc, Rating of YUM. Apricot and tropical flavors, tangerine/citrus and a sweet grassy/herb-y taste. A touch sweet, it would be great for a steamy night in Morocco (or Florida).


Carrascal, Rating of Nice. Spice, coffee, deep plum, raspberry/raisin. Bold with a nice smooth finish.

Category # 3 – The Pairing


Sauvignon Blank Rating of YUM. Going back to that steamy night in Morocco-I can picture myself sipping this wine and eating this piquant dish while sitting on a decorative pillow on the floor with lots of rich fabrics draped around. Ok back to reality.


Red Rating of YUM. The red intensified the mixture of spices and the sweet raisins. It complimented the dish well and made it shine. It was a bit richer than I have been drinking lately but if you like a bold but well balanced red this will be perfect.

Where to buy
All the wines will be for sale locally at the Grotto in San Marco. You can contact Mitch Woodlief, grottomitch@aol.com with questions and pricing (please call first to ensure they have the wine in stock) and anyone outside the Greater Jacksonville area can contact E-MAIL: info@broadbent.com
PHONE: US +1 415-931-1725. 

Roasted Moroccan Carrots and Tofu

Inspired by Cooking Light, Roasted Moroccan Spiced Grapes and Chicken, April 2012
Serves 4
Vegan, Gluten Free, Dairy Free

Ingredients

1 large onion, chopped
1 bunch (about 6 medium) carrots, chopped (I used KYV Farm)
2 small potatoes, chopped (KYV Farm)
1 block tofu, pressed and cut into cubes

Seasoning (get this ready first)
1 Tbsp olive oil
3/4 tsp each salt, black pepper, ground cumin, ground coriander
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp red pepper


Garnish
1/3 cup fresh parsley
1/4 cup raisins

Directions

1. Preheat baking dish in oven to 450F. 

2. In a medium bowl mix seasoning mix with a whisk.  Add onion, carrot and tofu; toss to coat.

3. Remove heated dish from oven and spray with cooking spray; spoon carrot mixture over evenly.  Bake 45 minutes or until veggies are browned and tender; tossing halfway through.
4. Divide mixture over four plates, top with raisins and fresh parsley.



Nutrition Facts
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving


Calories 247.2
Total Fat 11.2 g
Saturated Fat 1.6 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 4.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 4.3 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 521.7 mg
Potassium 1,024.4 mg
Total Carbohydrate 39.0 g
Dietary Fiber 8.2 g
Sugars 10.3 g
Protein 16.5 g


Vitamin A 230.7 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 26.4 %
Vitamin C 52.5 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 5.3 %
Calcium 62.8 %
Copper 25.8 %
Folate 17.3 %
Iron 23.7 %
Magnesium 23.2 %
Manganese 68.7 %
Niacin 11.7 %
Pantothenic Acid 6.7 %
Phosphorus 26.7 %
Riboflavin 11.2 %
Selenium 21.6 %
Thiamin 19.8 %
Zinc 13.2 %


*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Mar 022012
 
Two facts.
1. Waste and I are not friends.

2. Kids have no problem with waste.

For example. I bought Band-Aids with Tinkerbell on them.
Every morning my daughter asks me if she can have a Band-Aid.

“Where is the booboo?”
She inspects her hands, brow wrinkling in thought.
“Right here.” Pointing to her fingertip.
I lean down, “that is the red marker you drew all over my recipe with.”
“You aren’t bleeding and we don’t need to waste a Band-Aid.”
“What’s waste?” She asks.
“Waste is when you don’t use something and just throw it away.”
“So it goes to the trash mountain? That is full of diapers?” she asks.
“Yes, that is correct.”
Again the brow wrinkling and contemplation. 

She looks up. “Can I have a Band-Aid?” she asks.

Sigh.  She’s three, so I’ll cut her some slack.

The next day she wanted some pineapple. She ate the entire can and I stared at the juice, contemplating what to do with it.  Hmmmm, I thought, hmmmm. This would make a great marinade when paired with soy sauce or miso. I don’t use enough miso so I went with that.

So, in the continuation of my War on Waste, this recipe was born.

A little salty from the miso, a little sweet/tart from the pineapple and nice spice from the curry.  This went perfectly with my stir fried rice and cabbage to create a sort of Asian-Indian fusion.

Baked Pineapple Curry Tofu with Fried Basmati Rice and Veggies
Rice recipe inspired by Eating Well
Serves about 4-6
Vegan, Gluten Free, Dairy Free

Tofu Ingredients

1 block firm organic tofu
1 cup pineapple juice
2 Tbsp curry powder
2 heaping Tbsp white miso
2 tsp dark sesame oil

Rice Ingredients
2 cups cooked basmati rice

2 teaspoons canola oil
1 onion, diced

2 carrots cut into matchsticks
4 cups cabbage, shredded
1 cup sliced green onion
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 to 1 tsp dried ginger
1 1/2 Tbsp Bragg Liquid Aminos
2 Tbsp rice vinegar
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
Hot red pepper sauce, to taste

Directions

1. Press tofu 1 hour to overnight to remove water. Cut into 1 inch cubes. Whisk marinade in a small bowl and pour over tofu. Marinate overnight. 


2. Preheat oven to 375. Spray a baking sheet with cooking spray; add tofu and bake 30 to 40 minutes or until golden.


3. Heat canola oil in a wok or straight sided skillet over medium-high heat; add onion and carrot and cook about 5 minutes. Add cabbage, green onion, garlic and ginger; cook an additional two minutes or until veggies are softened.


4. Add the cooked rice, soy sauce and vinegar to the pan; cook until the liquid is absorbed, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Remove from the heat; stir in sesame oil and hot sauce.

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Tofu Nutrition Facts
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving
Calories 122.1
Total Fat 8.8 g
Saturated Fat 1.4 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 4.8 g
Monounsaturated Fat 2.3 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 33.3 mg
Potassium 324.3 mg
Total Carbohydrate 14.3 g
Dietary Fiber 3.1 g
Sugars 8.7 g
Protein 13.5 g
Vitamin A 3.50%
Vitamin B-12 0.10%
Vitamin B-6 9.40%
Vitamin C 12.00%
Vitamin D 0.00%
Vitamin E 0.30%
Calcium 58.40%
Copper 21.20%
Folate 11.10%
Iron 19.20%
Magnesium 16.80%
Manganese 89.20%
Niacin 3.30%
Pantothenic Acid 2.00%
Phosphorus 18.30%
Riboflavin 7.40%
Selenium 21.80%
Thiamin 11.90%
Zinc 11.30%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Rice Nutrition Facts
4 Servings
Amount Per Serving
Calories 161.6
Total Fat 3.5 g
Saturated Fat 0.3 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1.2 g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.8 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 440.8 mg
Potassium 122.5 mg
Total Carbohydrate 31.0 g
Dietary Fiber 1.1 g
Sugars 3.7 g
Protein 800.1 g
Vitamin A 60.20%
Vitamin B-12 0.00%
Vitamin B-6 4.30%
Vitamin C 5.50%
Vitamin D 0.00%
Vitamin E 3.30%
Calcium 1.60%
Copper 1.50%
Folate 2.10%
Iron 5.10%
Magnesium 1.50%
Manganese 10.80%
Niacin 6.90%
Pantothenic Acid 1.00%
Phosphorus 1.90%
Riboflavin 1.30%
Selenium 0.90%
Thiamin 10.60%
Zinc 0.90%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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